February 18, 2004

ERP KiM Newsletter 18-02-04

Serbian Patriarch calls on Solana, Holkeri to protect the Church interests in Kosovo

"We sincerely hope that you will protect the interests of our Church by your official reaction in timely fashion and undertake concrete measures to make it known that the establishment of a society based on law in Kosovo and Metohija cannot be implemented by the provisional authorities of the Province to anyone's detriment," emphasized Patriarch Pavle in his letter.


Patriarch Pavle requests from Solana and Holkeri to prevent destruction of the Serbian Orthodox Catherdral in Pristina (archive photo: His Holiness Patriarch Pavle with the UNMIK chief Harri Holkeri on Christmas, Jan 7, 2004)

CONTENTS:

Serbian Patriarch, calls on Solana, Holkeri to protect Church interests
The Patriarch sent a letter to Solana and Holkeri following attempts by the Kosovo ministry for education, science and technology to obtain a decision from the Pristina municipal assembly confiscating the right of the Serbian Orthodox Church to use a parcel of land on which the Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of Christ the Savior, still under construction, is located, as well as the lot foreseen for the construction of the St. Sava Cultural Center.

Bishop Artemije meets with U.S. General Beck
"Please do not ever withdraw your security checkpoints without first talking to the Serbs," asked Bishop Artemije, explaining that such decisions cannot be considered justified if the Serbs feel fearful and insecurity upon KFOR's withdrawal. The U.S. general explained that during the course of his mandate he regularly paid attention to the interests of the local population in Kosovo, and that he will recommend that his replacement do the same.

Holkeri claims that reports on Holy Archangels' case are "unfounded"
The Diocese of Raska and Prizren is deeply disappointed by the lack of understanding on the part of Mr. Holkeri, who has already demonstrated at a recent session of the UN Security Council in New York by his presentation of a highly biased report on the situation in Kosovo and Metohija, that he yet another in a series of international bureaucrats presenting inaccurate picture of the real situation in the Province to protect his career and possibly his very life.

Red Cross brings food to monks in Holy Archangels Monastery
The Orthodox monastery near Prizren, whose remains have weathered the passage of time for more than 650 years, and its monks have been in the focus of public attention in the last several weeks due to the decision of German KFOR to cease providing them with assistance as a result of a protest by the monks after they were attacked by a group of Albanians in Djakovica.

OSCE official says U.S. falsified grounds for 1999 bombing of Serbia

Pellnas said he was certain the US had assisted secessionist guerrillas in the province since 1998, and saw them as a future ally in a ground assault on Belgrade. He said that former US president Bill Clinton had imposed his policy on the international community for dealing with Belgrade and Kosovo.

CHRONICLES: George Soros postmodern villain - NGO's behold your God
Mr. Soros' peculiar moral values, political views, and ideological preferences would be immaterial without the money that he can spend promoting and imposing them. The bulk of that money-currently estimated at not less than seven billion dollars-was earned in the minus-sum game of currency and stock speculation, contributing nothing to the creation of wealth and making millions of ordinary people poorer in the process.

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Serbian Patriarch calls on Solana, Holkeri to protect Church interests

The Patriarch sent a letter to Solana and Holkeri following attempts by the Kosovo ministry for education, science and technology to obtain a decision from the Pristina municipal assembly confiscating the right of the Serbian Orthodox Church to use a parcel of land on which the Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of Christ the Savior, still under construction, is located, as well as the lot foreseen for the construction of the St. Sava Cultural Center.

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Beta News Agency, Belgrade
February 17, 2004
 
 
BELGRADE - Serbian Patriarch Pavle called on the European Union's high commissioner for foreign policy and security Javier Solana and UNMIK chief Harri Holkeri to protect the rights of the Serbian Orthodox Church (SOC) in Kosovo and Metohija.
 
The Patriarch sent a letter to Solana and Holkeri following attempts by the Kosovo ministry for education, science and technology to obtain a decision from the Pristina municipal assembly confiscating the right of the Serbian Orthodox Church to use a parcel of land on which the Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of Christ the Savior, still under construction, is located, as well as the lot foreseen for the construction of the St. Sava Cultural Center.
 
In his letter the Serbian Patriarch states that "it is not the intent of the SOC to provoke the Albanian community nor the University of Pristina but to serve, through the presence of an active Orthodox church and the center, as a source and as evidence of multinational relations toward the creation of a present-day multiethnic and multiconfessional Kosovo and Metohija".
 
"We sincerely hope that you will protect the interests of our Church by your official reaction in timely fashion and undertake concrete measures to make it known that the establishment of a society based on law in Kosovo and Metohija cannot be implemented by the provisional authorities of the Province to anyone's detriment," emphasized Patriarch Pavle in his letter.
 
The ministry of education in the Kosovo government has submitted several proposals to Pristina municipal authorities that the existing but incomplete Church of Christ the Savior be removed.
 
The Kosovo ministry of education earlier claimed that the church was built on property belonging to the University of Pristina and that it was built illegally without a construction permit.
 
The justification for the ministry's proposal is that the Church supposedly does not have valid ownership titles for the land.
 
Bishop Artemije of Raska and Prizren, however, said that the SOC has all necessary documentation confirming that the church was built legally.
 
UNMIK spokesperson Sunil Narula told Beta last year that UNMIK will not allow the destruction of the Orthodox Church of Christ the Savior in Pristina.
 
The medieval Church of Christ the Savior in Pristina, reminded Bishop Artemije, was destroyed by the Turks in 14th century along with 11 Orthodox churches, who built the present Pirinez mosque on its foundations.

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Bishop Artemije meets with U.S. general Beck

"Please do not ever withdraw your security checkpoints without first talking to the Serbs," asked Bishop Artemije, explaining that such decisions cannot be considered justified if the Serbs feel fearful and insecurity upon KFOR's withdrawal. The U.S. general explained that during the course of his mandate he regularly paid attention to the interests of the local population in Kosovo, and that he will recommend that his replacement do the same.

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ERP KIM Info Service
Gracanica, February 17, 2004

(photo: Bishop Artemije with the U.S. General in Gracanica Monastery - photo from one of the earlier meetings)

Bishop Artemije received the commander of KFOR Multinational Brigade East, U.S. general Jerry G. Beck, Jr., in the Bishop's residence in Gracanica on Tuesday in order to exchange views on the current situation in Kosovo. The general also wanted to say farewell to the Bishop as he will be leaving within a week.

When asked by his guest for his impressions from his recent visit to the United States, Bishop Artemije spoke of meetings with a number of congressmen, senators and other U.S. officials to whom he presented a realistic picture of the situation in Kosovo and Metohija. The Bishop said that most of them responded with a high degree of understanding and desire to hear him out. A few U.S. citizens themselves testified regarding the difficult position of the Serbs in Kosovo and Metohija.

"We have the responsibility of providing our observations in written form to a few people who were orally informed regarding details of the actual situation. The news that has been arriving in the U.S. thus far," emphasized Bishop Artemije, "has been lacking in reports of the true situation of the Serb people and as a result I had to go there and provide testimony. After five years, there are still attacks and murders of Serbs, and destruction and torching of churches. The Serb people are denied the possibility of employment, education and adequate health care in the cities, such as Pristina, Gnjilane, Urosevac and Prizren, where there is not a single Serb physician, nor do the Serbs have anyone to turn to or on whom they can count on for help. During the past five years more than 1,300 murders of Serbs have taken place and not one criminal has been found or brought to justice, like the destroyers of over 110 Serbian churches and monasteries. All of these perpetrators are still free and feel emboldened to continue their crimes against the Serbian people. The Serbs, on the other hand, are discouraged from continuing their stay in Kosovo and are leaving. More recent incidents include the massacre of children in Gorazdevac, the murder of the Stolic family in Obilic, and attacks on the churches in Gornja Brnjica and near Stimlje, among others," Bishop Artemije told the U.S. general.

General Beck explained that at least in his sector he was well-received by both the Kosovo Serbs and the Kosovo Albanians, and that no major crimes occurred. The general pointed out the reduced crime rate in Kosovo and that clashes are occurring with increasing frequency among the Albanians themselves. General Beck also saw the growth and strengthening of the Kosovo Police Service as another encouraging sign.

Bishop Artemije pointed out that he could not limit his observations to only the U.S. sector where the situation is somewhat better but had to look at Kosovo as a whole. Nevertheless, the Bishop also pointed out incidents that occurred in the last six months in the U.S. sector, too: attacks near Vitina and Klokot and other areas in the U.S. KFOR zone of responsibility. The Bishop also expressed skepticism regarding the murders occurring among the Albanians themselves, claiming they were clashes between mafia leaders, such as also occur in other parts of the world. These attacks had no connection with ethnically based attacks on Serbs with the goal of frightening them and chasing them out of Kosovo and Metohija. "The Serb people have no confidence in the KPS after all of the crimes that have occurred and remain unresolved," concluded Bishop Artemije.

The U.S. general agreed with Bishop Artemije that although time heals many things, there is no time left for the Serbs in Kosovo since their numbers are dwindling with each passing day. At the end of the meeting, general Beck asked the Bishop to advise him of what he should tell his replacement, general Allenson (sp?), who will soon be assuming the duties of commander of MNB East.

"Please do not ever withdraw your security checkpoints without first talking to the Serbs," asked Bishop Artemije, explaining that such decisions cannot be considered justified if the Serbs feel fearful and insecurity upon KFOR's withdrawal. "Unfortunately, this was not done in the village of Miroc near Vucitrn, and as a result all the Serbs in the village left. The officials of the countries which made this decision were certainly led solely by the official reports they got from UNMIK and KFOR representatives and other international institutions present in Kosovo but this is not the real situation of the Kosovo Serbs," said the Bishop. "We are especially shocked by the behavior of members of German KFOR, which unilaterally decided to discontinue providing escorts for the monks of Holy Archangels Monastery near Prizren. They have gone so far in punishing the monks that they issued orders for soldiers to throw away leftover food rather than share it with the monk guarding the Bishop's residence in Prizren, although they know that he cannot go and buy food in Prizren himself without an escort," explained the Bishop.

The U.S. general explained that during the course of his mandate he regularly paid attention to the interests of the local population in Kosovo, and that he will recommend that his replacement do the same.

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Holkeri claims that reports regarding the problem of the Holy Archangels Monastery are "exaggerated and unfounded"

The Diocese of Raska and Prizren is deeply disappointed by the lack of understanding on the part of Mr. Holkeri, who has already demonstrated at a recent session of the UN Security Council in New York by his presentation of a highly biased report on the situation in Kosovo and Metohija, that he yet another in a series of international bureaucrats presenting inaccurate picture of the real situation in the Province to protect his career and possibly his very life.

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ERP KIM Info Service
Gracanica, February 16, 2004

(Holkeri: yet another in a series of international bureaucrats presenting inaccurate picture of the real situation in the Province to protect his career and possibly his very life)

The UNMIK communiqué following the meeting of Harri Holkeri and Dr. Nebojsa Covic in Pristina says, among other things, that the UNMIK chief told Mr. Covic that "UNMIK and KFOR are determined to ensure freedom of movement and maintain safety and security, and that the concerns of the monks being brought up by the media are exaggerated and unfounded".

Sadly, from this statement of the UNMIK chief, like from the recent response of the KFOR commander German general Holger Kammerhof to Dr. Nebojsa Covic, it is apparent that the leaders of the international presence in Kosovo and Metohija not only fail to understand the problems with which the Serbian Orthodox Church is confronted but are attempting to consciously deceive the public by making inaccurate claims, concealing the truth and side-stepping responsibility.

The Diocese notes that German KFOR first attempted to cover up the truth regarding the attack by a group of extremist Albanians on monks from Holy Archangels Monastery and German KFOR vehicles in Djakovica on January 21; after the details of the incident were published anyway they immediately launched a series of repressive measures against the monks and substituted an escort regime which in reality does not permit normal visits to the faithful nor carrying out the most basic religious and humanitarian services in the Prizren area.

Not one official representative of UNMIK or the KFOR command has found it expedient to visit the monks in Holy Archangels Monastery or establish contact with the Diocese of Raska and Prizren regarding this problem; apparently they have accepted the version of events of German lieutenant colonel Kai Brinkmann who is guided by personal principles of vanity and intolerance toward Serbs instead of acting in accordance with a military code of ethics. Instead of assuming an objective position and hearing out the other side, the KFOR commander apparently lent his support to his local commander and compatriot in Prizren, who will be remembered by the Serbs for his infamous order to throw leftover food from the German troops into the garbage to be eaten by stray dogs rather than sharing it with a Serbian priest in the Bishop's residence, who is prevented from purchasing his own food in the city by the lack of freedom of movement.

Claims that KFOR will allegedly work with UNMIK police in providing escorts for the monks of Holy Archangels are just another in a series of deceptions because during the last several days the monks have been told in no uncertain terms that KFOR will not provide escorts and that the ultimate goal of that decision is, in fact, to turn over escorts to the Kosovo Police Service. The monks have repeatedly explained that they have no confidence in a police service that has not managed to resolve a single crime against Serbs. While arrest campaigns of Albanians suspected of murdering and torturing their compatriots continue, Albanian crimes against Serbs remain a taboo topic out of fear of reactions by the Albanian public and possible repressive measures against international personnel.

The Diocese of Raska and Prizren is deeply disappointed by the lack of understanding on the part of Mr. Holkeri, who has already demonstrated at a recent session of the UN Security Council in New York by his presentation of a highly biased report on the situation in Kosovo and Metohija, that he yet another in a series of international bureaucrats presenting inaccurate picture of the real situation in the Province to protect his career and possibly his very life.

The Diocese expresses its sincere hope that the global community will learn from the example of the inhumane treatment of these six monks who live in an isolated monastery surrounded by barbed wire the true intentions and methods of the leadership of the peacekeeping mission whose primary and apparently only goal has become to justify its own failures and find a successful exit strategy by turning over all authority to purely Albanian institutions to the detriment of the Serb and other non-Albanian population.

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Red Cross brings food to monks in Holy Archangels Monastery

The Orthodox monastery near Prizren, whose remains have weathered the passage of time for more than 650 years, and its monks have been in the focus of public attention in the last several weeks due to the decision of German KFOR to cease providing them with assistance as a result of a protest by the monks after they were attacked by a group of Albanians in Djakovica.

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Beta News Agency, Belgrade
February 17, 2004
 
 
PRIZREN - In the last several days the Serbian Red Cross has brought a larger quantity of food and other basic essentials to the monks of Holy Archangels Monastery, hieromonk Benedict informed Beta today.

The most recent delivery to the monks in the isolated monastery is one of a series provided by the Serbian Red Cross to the monks of the monastery, said the on duty hieromonk of the Bishop's residence in Prizren.
 
The Orthodox monastery near Prizren, whose remains have weathered the passage of time for more than 650 years, and its monks have been in the focus of public attention in the last several weeks due to the decision of German KFOR to cease providing them with assistance as a result of a protest by the monks after they were attacked by a group of Albanians in Djakovica.
 
At the beginning of this month the Diocese of Raska and Prizren informed the public that monks in Prizren and the nearby Holy Archangels Monastery were being denied food, electricity and escorts by German KFOR, who told them that in the future they should refer to representatives of the Kosovo Police Service for security escorts.
 
Bishop Artemije of Raska and Prizren strongly condemned the behavior of the German KFOR contingent and emphasized that it is leading to the direct expulsion of the Orthodox Church from Kosovo and Metohija, leaving the remaining Serbs without religious services, the possibility of confession and last rites, noted the Diocese.
 
Just in German KFOR's area of responsibility since the end of the armed conflict and the arrival of KFOR in June 1999 30 Orthodox churches and monasteries have been destroyed. Father Chariton Lukic, a monk of Holy Archangels Monastery, was kidnapped in the center of Prizren and later found headless, reminded the monks.


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OSCE official says U.S. falsified grounds for 1999 bombing of Serbia

Pellnas said he was certain the US had assisted secessionist guerrillas in the province since 1998, and saw them as a future ally in a ground assault on Belgrade. He said that former US president Bill Clinton had imposed his policy on the international community for dealing with Belgrade and Kosovo.

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SRNA News Agency, Bijeljina
February 17, 2004

SOFIA -- Tuesday - The United States justified the 1999 bombing of Yugoslavia with false claims of genocide being committed in Kosovo, an OSCE official and participant in peace talks during the war in the province said in comments published today.

Bo Pellnas, a member of the OSCE mission in Belgrade, said there were some 1,200 OSCE observers in Kosovo who could confirm genocide did not take place, reports Sofia daily Monitor.

Pellnas said he was certain the US had assisted secessionist guerrillas in the province since 1998, and saw them as a future ally in a ground assault on Belgrade. He said that former US president Bill Clinton had imposed his policy on the international community for dealing with Belgrade and Kosovo.



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CHRONICLES: George Soros, Postmodern Villain - NGO's, Behold your God

Mr. Soros' peculiar moral values, political views, and ideological preferences would be immaterial without the money that he can spend promoting and imposing them. The bulk of that money-currently estimated at not less than seven billion dollars-was earned in the minus-sum game of currency and stock speculation, contributing nothing to the creation of wealth and making millions of ordinary people poorer in the process.

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CHRONICLES, Monday, February 16, 2004

by Serge Trifkovic

NGO's, Behold Your God.

George Soros was born in Budapest in 1930 but, today, spends most of his time in New York City. Not much is known about his early years. He is the only eminent "holocaust survivor" who has been accused of collaboration with the Nazis. In 1947, he managed to sneak through the Iron Curtain, and, the official story goes, "he landed penniless in London, but by hard work and sheer genius, he rose to become one of the planet's most successful investors and richest men."

Mr. Soros' peculiar moral values, political views, and ideological preferences would be immaterial without the money that he can spend promoting and imposing them. The bulk of that money-currently estimated at not less than seven billion dollars-was earned in the minus-sum game of currency and stock speculation, contributing nothing to the creation of wealth and making millions of ordinary people poorer in the process.
His offshore Quantum Fund-legally headquartered in Curacao, beyond U.S.-government supervision-specializes in speculative investments to take advantage of deliberately induced political and economic weaknesses of different countries and regions. In an interview with the Swiss weekly L'hebdo (May 1993), Soros outlined his strategy: "I speculate on discrepancy between the reality and the public image of this reality, until a correctional mechanism occurs, which approaches these two."

His profits are staggering. On September 16, 1992, he famously made a billion dollars in one day by betting against the Bank of England and the pound sterling. In July 1997, he contributed to the Southeast Asian financial crisis by shorting the Thai bath. In early 2000, he supposedly suffered losses on tech stocks, but some analysts now suggest that the burn of the NASDAQ was controlled and that Soros helped to start the fire. By last November, he was betting the U.S. dollar would plummet. As the London Independent reported (November 28, 2003), his activities were contributing to a growing belief on Wall Street that the dollar would slide even further.

There is nothing new in Soros' approach to making money or in the ability of such a person to make an impact, invariably detrimental, on his host society's morals and culture. What is new with Mr. Soros-in addition to the implausible claim that a private speculator could get as far as he has unaided by any established financial interests-is his systematic, concerted effort to use a large part of his fortune to promote his peculiar social and political views. He does so through a global network of "nongovernmental organizations" named after himself and active primarily in Eastern Europe but also in Africa, Latin America, and the United States. At age 75, money is not his object but his tool. He has used it to develop a well-coordinated global operation centered on the Open Society Institute (OSI) in New York, which funds a network of subsidiaries in over 50 countries.

Even before the Open Society network came into being, Soros' blueprint for postcommunist "shock therapy" reform had been put to the test. First came Poland, where the first postcommunist prime minister, Tadeusz Mazowiecki, was close to Soros and subsequently remained associated with his local subsidiary, the Stefan Batory Foundation. In his book Underwriting Democracy, Soros says that he personally prepared the broad outlines of Poland's comprehensive economic reform:

I joined forces with Professor Jeffrey Sachs of Harvard University, who was advocating a similar program, and sponsored his work in Poland through the Stefan Batory Foundation . . . The IMF approved and the program went into effect on Jan. 1, 1990. It was very tough on the population, but people were willing to take a lot of pain in order to see real change.

Poland was only a start, however; far more important to his goals was his association in 1991-92 with Russia's "reformist" leaders Anatoly Chubais and Yegor Gaidar and their Harvard guru Sachs. Within a year of their "shock therapy," hyperinflation had wiped out Russians' savings and the long-suffering middle class with it. Pensioners were literally starving. The parallel "privatization" of Russia's huge resources-timber, oil, gas, chemicals, media-created the robber oligarchs and contributed to Russia's effective deindustrialization. The country was lowered into neocolonial dependence: a supplier of energy and raw materials and an importer of high technology and manufactured goods. Nevertheless, in early 1993, Soros felt that Russia had not gone far enough: "The social safety net would also provide a powerful incentive to shut down loss-making enterprises. Factories could be idled and the raw materials and energy that go into production could be sold for more than the output."

George Soros is out to deconstruct nations and states as Europe has known them for centuries, with Russia always the main prize. In an interview with the Moscow daily Komersant (August 8, 1997), he declared that "a strong central government in Russia cannot be democratic." "The rescue of a free Russian economy depends on the attraction of Western investments," he added, and, to that end, "Russia's general public must accept the ideology of an open society."

By that time, a total of 29 "Soros Foundations" were active in every postcommunist country. In 1994, his foundations spent a total of $300 million; by 1998, that figure had risen to $574 million. These are enormous sums in an impoverished and vulnerable Eastern Europe.

Those foundations say that they are "dedicated to building and maintaining the infrastructure and institutions of an open society." What this means in practice is clear from their many fruits. Regarding "women's health" programs in Central and Southeastern Europe, for instance, one will look in vain for breast-cancer detection or prenatal or postnatal care. Soros' main goal is clear and frankly stated: "to improve the quality of abortion services." Accordingly, his Public Health Program has supported the introduction of medical abortion in Albania, Latvia, Lithuania, and Slovakia and the introduction of manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) abortion in Macedonia, Moldova, and Russia. In addition,

OSI has also worked with international and local NGOs to respond to the growing strength of the antiabortion movement. Through its influence on ministries of health and hospital administrators, that movement has made strides in reducing access to abortion . . . OSI will continue to support training in quality of care and efforts to keep abortion legal, safe, and accessible for all women in the region.

Why is Soros so interested in promoting more abortions in Eastern Europe? Overpopulation cannot be the reason: The region is experiencing a colossal demographic collapse and has some of the lowest fertility rates in the world. Unavailability of abortion cannot be the answer either: According to a recent U.N. report, five European countries had more abortions than live births in 2000-the Russian Federation, Bulgaria, Belarus, Rumania, and Ukraine. Overall, the report said, abortion rates are "substantially higher in central and eastern Europe and the CIS countries than in western Europe and North America." The only logical answer is that Soros wants as few Russians and others born into this world as possible.

Soros' public-health programs also "support initiatives focusing on the specific health needs of several marginalized communities" and promote "harm reduction": "Its primary goal is to empower drug users to protect their health. Needle/syringe exchange and substitution therapies (e.g., methadone) are at the center of harm reduction health interventions." His "harm reducers" have expanded their work with special initiatives on "sex workers" and prisoners and launched a policy initiative that attempts to ensure that "repressive drug policies do not impede the expansion of harm reduction efforts."

Over the past five years, the Soros network has given a successful start to previously nonexistent "gay" activism in almost all of its areas of operation. The campaign for "LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender] Rights" is directed from Budapest, where Miriam Molnar's 1999 policy paper published by OSI defined the "problem" as discrimination and the low level of acceptance, visibility, and political representation of LGBT's. It was necessary either "to convince the society to accept LGBT people as equal and let the society make pressure [sic] to the politicians (through media) to change laws" or "to convince the politicians that LGBT people are equal and that they need help in convincing the rest of the society." The overall goals were to generate discussion about LGBT identity within the community, to make them visible and "create a positive image," and to establish regular forums of discussion with other groups in the region. Specific tasks included the development of websites in English with subsites in local languages, the establishment of task forces that would react to all "homophobic"
media outbursts in one "Pink Book," and the organization of two-week summer schools for teachers that would "provide training about discrimination of [sic] LGBT people, disabled people, overweight people etc."

In November 1999, a pilot project began at the Center for Publishing Development (OSI Budapest) on homosexual books in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia, and Slovakia. That same year, Nash Mir (Our World) Gay and Lesbian Center announced that it had been registered as an NGO in the Ukraine. From that moment, the group was free to pursue its stated goals, including "fight against sexual-orientation discrimination" and "homophobic sentiments in societal consciousness" and "assistance to upbringing of gays' and lesbians' self-consciousness as equal and valuable members of society." The group expressed gratitude for its legalization to the "Ukrainian branch of Soros Foundation Network (Renaissance Foundation) which lobbied our question in the Ministry of Justice and render [sic] legal assistance to us."

Gay.ru is a Soros-funded Moscow NGO that has developed "into an established and recognized Russian gay and lesbian center" and "the clearing house for lesbian and gay groups scattered across the country":

We keep contacts with all existing gay, lesbian, and AIDS organizations in Russia and maintain on-going correspondence and reporting to international gay and lesbian organizations . . . We have collected the biggest off-line library that features over a hundred Russian titles and some fifty English classic books on gay studies. It was greatly enhanced by the Core Collection on Gay and Lesbian Issues awarded to us by the Soros Foundation in 2000.

In Bucharest, Monika Barcsy of the local Soros branch bewailed the fact that, in Rumania, "the homosexual identity is stigmatized" and is one of the main bases for treating individuals as "the others" in an attitude of intolerance. Their families became the victims of prejudice "just because the society is unable to accept the legitimacy of same-sex relations as a 'normal' manifestation." The author singles out the Rumanian Orthodox Church as a prime culprit: "The problem is that many Christian Orthodox students' organizations and other student groups support the church." In 1994, she points out, more than 100 theology students began a series of demonstrations in front of Rumania's parliament against homosexual propaganda in the media and collected signatures demanding legislation to criminalize same-sex relations.
Barcsy concludes by reiterating the standard Soros line:

Gay men and lesbians need rights that guarantee them the expression of their identity in the public sphere . . . [T]he legal status of gays and lesbians, their ability to move and appear in public, to speak out and act together should be considered a very good test of the civic openness. [It] can't be resolved with the new laws made under the pressure of different human rights organizations. Romania needs . . . to ameliorate the negative responses towards the homosexuals from the majority population . . . There are "problems" with the society as a whole, and the society's mentality can't be changed overnight.

A key pillar of Soros' activities is his dictum that "no-one has a monopoly on the truth" and that "civic education" should replace the old "authoritarian" model. Civic education does not have to be "just a dialogue" between a teacher and students, he says; in addition, "we have projects like health education, where people use new ways to discuss issues like hygiene, diet, and sex." While "this does not sound like traditional civic education," he continues, it is "a new way for teachers to relate to their pupils," just as citizens must relate in new ways to governments and elected officials in societies trying to become more open and democratic.

Accordingly, throughout postcommunist Eastern Europe, the Soros Foundation's primary stated goal is to "democratize the education system" by "instituting curriculum reforms." What this means in practice has been demonstrated over the past three years by Serbia's education minister Gaso Knezevic, a friend and confidante of Soros. Since the first day of his tenure, Mr. Knezevic has insisted that schools must be transformed from "authoritarian" institutions into "exercise grounds" for the "unhindered expression of students' personalities in the process of equal-footed interaction with the teaching staff, thus overcoming the obsolete concept of authority and discipline rooted in the oppressive legacy of patriarchal past." Mr. Knezevic started his reform with primary schools, with a pilot program of "educational workshops" for children ages 7 to 12. The accompanying manual, financed by the Open Society, rejects the quaint notion that the purpose of education is the "acquisition of knowledge" and insists that the teacher has to become the class "designer" and that his relationship with students should be based on "partnership."

In Russia, Soros' associates exercise great control over the selection of textbooks for Russian schools. According to a press release by the Gaidar Youth Library, financial support from the Open Society Institute provided it with computers, videocassettes, and CD's, all of which made "special training" for the children of "underprivileged people" possible in the library:

We organized a special seminar "Children's rights nowadays" for all specialists who took part in our project . . . The working group of the program "The Circle of Friends" is grateful to the "Open Society" Institute (Soros Fund, Budapest) for the opportunity to realize this project in a full volume.

In 1999, the Moscow Open Society office started a major five-year project, "The Development of Education in Russia." Its goal is to "reeducate rural teachers at a cost of US $100-150 million" (Nezavisimaya Gazeta, September 19, 1998). It is also applying a program called "Tolerance" in Russian secondary schools, but its masterminds may have made a linguistic blunder. According to a Russian critic of the program,

The Russian translation of this Latin word-tyerpimost-has the dual meaning of prostitution and could be confused with doma tyerpimosti, houses of ill fame . . . How come this financial manipulator tries to teach us about tolerance, us who grew up with Leo Tolstoy, one of the first philosophers of non-violence? . . . But Mr. Soros is also a horribly distorted mirror, which should make us see our own, present image, without blinking or turning away. There are times when evil can become an eye-opener, when its derisive laughter can waken us up and help regaining our strength. We should not miss this opportunity.

A first step in that direction may have been taken last November 7, when the OSI Moscow office was raided by a private security company hired by the owner of the building with whom the foundation was engaged in a protracted legal battle. Only weeks before, Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the billionaire oligarch and OSI Moscow executive director who has his own NGO called the Open Russia Foundation, was arrested and charged with tax evasion, theft, forgery, and fraud. Soros denounced the arrest as an act of "persecution" that should disqualify Russia from belonging to the G-8 group of industrialized countries. "I believe that he acted within the constraints of the law. I am doing the same in the United States," said Soros, alluding to his multimillion-dollar donations toward "regime change" in Washington next November. The American press indignantly reported that the raid was directed against a philanthropic organization that had spent "more than $US 1 billion on charitable projects in Russia in the past 15 years."

"Racism" is Soros' regular obsession, but he faced the potential problem of finding it in racially nondiverse Eastern European countries. This has been resolved by identifying a designated victim group-Gypsies! "Few minority groups in Europe face as much social, economic, and political discrimination as do Romani people," says OSI. Being a "Roma activist" has become a lucrative designation within the community. Seventy of the most promising ones came to the conference "Roma in Expanding Europe: Challenges for the Future," held in Budapest last summer, at which Soros inaugurated a "Decade of Roma Inclusion." The conference offered policy recommendations, some of which could have been written by Jesse Jackson: first, obligatory and free preschool education in desegregated classrooms; second, Romani assistants in the classroom, especially in preschool; third, antibias training for teachers and school administrators; and fourth, integration of Romani history and culture in textbooks at all levels.

Legally mandated affirmative-action programs for Roma in high schools and universities were recommended by the delegations of Rumania and Serbia-Montenegro. On employment, the conference recommended tax incentives for those who employ Roma and access to low-interest credit for small Roma-owned family businesses. The Czech and Slovak delegations also proposed setting aside a percentage of government contracts for Roma construction firms. In the area of housing, specific demands were made to combat "racism and discrimination," including the "legalization"
of shantytowns and "equal access" to municipal housing. The conference concluded that combating racial discrimination against Roma must be pursued through the adoption of comprehensive anti-discrimination legislation complying with the requirements of the E.U. Race Equality Directive.

The Rumanian delegation demanded that the Bucharest government recognize the Roma holocaust by issuing a public apology along with urgent adoption of a reparations package. The European Union was asked to make sure that Roma are broadly involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of all E.U. spending on Roma projects.

Soros' "programs" would have been deemed laughable or outrageous in their target countries only a decade ago. No one is laughing today, however. For thousands of young Eastern Europeans, to become a "Soroshite" represents today what joining the Party represented to their parents: an alluring opportunity to have a reasonably paid job, to belong to a privileged elite, and, for many, to travel abroad. The chosen few go to Soros's own Central European University in Budapest, where they are taught that affirming a scientifically grounded truth is "totalitarian" and that the sovereign nation-state is evil.

There is not one patriot (Russian, Croat, Latvian, Serb, Rumanian, Hungarian) or one practicing Christian on Soros' payroll. In all postcommunist countries, Soros relies on the sons and daughters of the old communist establishment, who are less likely to be tainted by any atavistic attachments to their native soil, culture, and traditions. The more successful among them-and the most loyal-may spend years drifting from one "project" to another, and some have been living that way for more than a decade. Soros has revealed (in Underwriting Democracy) that his Open Society foundations will help create an international web, at the heart of which will be the computerized base of personal data that will enable Western multinationals to find the local candidates they need.

These new janissaries, just like those of the Ottoman army of old, have to prove their credentials by being more zealous than the master himself; as the Balkan proverb has it, "a convert is worse than a Turk." Nobody is more insanely vehement in his insults against the Serbian people and their history, religion, art, and suffering than a dozen Serb-born columnists who are on the payroll of Sonja Licht, Soros'
Gauleiter in Belgrade.

Hoi polloi are force-fed the daily fare of OSI agitprop by "the Soros media"-the term now exists in over a dozen languages-from the Gazeta Wyborcza in Warsaw to Danas (Today) in Serbia, the Monitor in Montenegro, the Markiza TV channel in Bratislava, and Vreme weekly and the B-92 electronic media conglomerate in Belgrade. They invariably parrot Soros' views and ambitions, reflected by the agenda of the local Soros foundation at home and, in world affairs, by the International Crisis Group (ICG), largely financed by Soros and run by his appointees.

Soros' agenda in world affairs is clear from the fact that his appointees include Gen. Wesley Clark, who commanded NATO forces in the war against Serbia in 1999; Louise Arbour, the former chief prosecutor of the Yugoslav war-crimes tribunal at The Hague; former assistant secretary of state Morton Abramowitz, an enthusiastic supporter of Bosnian Muslims and Albanians in the wars of Yugoslav succession; and former national security advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski, whose visceral Russophobia aided and abetted the rise of Osama bin Laden and his jihadist cohorts.

As Gilles d'Aymery noted two years ago, Soros is not just the power behind the Open Society Institute, the U.S. Institute of Peace, the National Endowment for Democracy, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, and the International Crisis Group:

[L]ike an immense Jules Verne octopus, [he] extends his tentacles all over Eastern Europe, South-Eastern Europe, the Caucasus as well as the republics of the former Soviet Union. With the help of these various groups [it is possible] not only to shape but to create the news, the agenda and public opinion to further aims which are, in short, the control of the world, its natural resources and the furtherance of the uniform ideal of a perfect world polity made in America.

That polity will not be "American" in any recognizable sense if Soros has his way, however. Here, he supports increased government spending and tax increases, drug legalization, euthanasia, open borders and immigration, immigrant entitlements, feminism, free abortion on demand, affirmative action, and "gay" rights. He opposes the death penalty in any circumstance. One of the trustees of OSI is Lani Guinier, the law professor whom Bill Clinton tried to nominate as head of the civil-rights division of the Department of Justice but changed his mind when she was found to favor minority veto power over legislation. Its president is Aryeh Neier, who had for 12 years been executive director of the Soros-funded Human Rights Watch and, before that, national director of the American Civil Liberties Union for eight years.

That he is anti-Bush is unremarkable, but Soros' statement last December that the defeat of the President is "a matter of life and death" was silly. His largesse to Bush's foes-although substantial-does not reflect the stated urgency of the moment: $15 million for America Coming Together; $3 million for John Podesta's new think tank; and $2.5 million for MoveOn.org falls far short of a month's cost of running his many foundations around the world.

Soros remains primarily committed to destroying the remaining bastions of the family, sovereign nationhood, and Christian Faith east of the Trieste-Stettin line. He senses that his full-throttle intervention in America is not necessary, because things are gradually going his way anyway. No matter who is his party's anointed candidate come next November, the real choice will be between George and Gyorgy, and that is not much of a choice.

Chronicles' foreign-affairs editor Srdja Trifkovic is the author of The Sword of the Prophet: Islam-History, Theology, Impact on the World.


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