September 20, 2003

ERP KIM Newsletter 20-09-03

THINGS ARE NOT AS WELL AS THEY APPEAR, MR. CLINTON


Bill Clinton in Kosovo greeted by ethnic Albanians
Behind raucous mood of Kosovo Albanians ethnic discrimination against Serbs
 and other communities, crimes and violence have deeply compromised the
UN granted "peace",  established after NATO intervention in 1999

CONTENTS:

EDITORIAL:

THINGS ARE NOT SO WELL AS THEY APPEAR, MR. CLINTON
The reception he got today in Pristina is certainly one Clinton would not have gotten anywhere else. Whenever he has visited Europe, he has been met by masses of demonstrators protesting his retrograde policies which have inflicted damage to the U.S. and Europe alike. The fact that a politician of considerable political and moral disrepute has been greeted by such ovations in Kosovo, overrun during the last four years of international "peace" by lawlessness and crimes against the weak and defenseless, perhaps is only becoming for Clinton at the end of his political career.

KOSOVO STILL LACKING DEMOCRACY, SAYS NEW GOVERNOR
HARRI HOLKERI: "The pain in Kosovo has not disappeared... It is still very much the same as it was four years ago but other big international conflicts and challenges have taken the interest of the media...and also the governments."

CLINTON, ON A VISIT TO KOSOVO, WARNS AGAINST "GETTING EVEN"
CLINTON: "My Bible says that vengeance belongs to God." He added that reconciliation was "the only way you can achieve a secure, stable and prosperous Kosovo."

MACEDONIA EMBRACES FOR INCREAS IN ETHNIC ALBANIAN SEPARATISM
The ANA guerrillas say they want to establish, through war if necessary, a state grouping all ethnic Albanians living in the region: in Albania, Kosovo, Macedonia, southern Serbia and Montenegro.

INTIMIDATING MESSAGES SPREAD AGAINST UNMIK STAFF (IN KOSOVO)
According to the police information, the return of the corpses of two AKSH members is requested in the messages; on the contrary, attack campaign will begin against crucial UNMIK officials.

GEN. MINI: KOSOVO'S SECURITY IS CRUCIAL FOR STABILITY OF THE REGION
MINI: The so-called organization AKSH has only criminal purposes and not positive projects for a better Kosovo for the Albanians. They have their criminal force, and they have nothing to offer, but they only follow their interests. They aim to destabilize the region and bring back the war. They strive to reach their criminal goals, and they do not care for the people or the country. We are fighting against this, and with the good understanding of Kosovo people, we will triumph.

INET - KOSOVO AND METOHIJA FLASH NEWS, SEP 19, 2003
 

PERPETRATORS OF GORAZDEVAC MASSACRE STILL NOT ARRESTED - DAY 37...

More News Available on our:

KOSOVO DAILY NEWS LIST (KDN)
KDN Archive

This newsletter is available on our ERP KIM Web-site:
/erpkiminfo.html


EDITORIAL

THINGS ARE NOT AS WELL AS THEY APPEAR, MR. CLINTON

The reception he got today in Pristina is certainly one Clinton would not have gotten anywhere else. Whenever he has visited Europe, he has been met by masses of demonstrators protesting his retrograde policies which have inflicted damage to the U.S. and Europe alike. The fact that a politician of considerable political and moral disrepute has been greeted by such ovations in Kosovo, overrun during the last four years of international "peace" by lawlessness and crimes against the weak and defenseless, perhaps is only becoming for Clinton at the end of his political career.

TOP

ERP KIM INFO SERVICE
September 19, 2003

"I pleased to see things look so well." These were the first words of former U.S. president William Jefferson Clinton as he exchanged embraces with Ibrahim Rugova, who, together with thousands of Kosovo Albanians, prepared an unforgettable reception for him today in Pristina.

Mr. Clinton probably did not even ask where are the members of the communities whose representatives he met during his last visit to Kosovo and Metohija in autumn of 1999 and whom he had promised that the Province would become an oasis of peace and tolerance. Such memories are hardly à propos in an atmosphere vividly reminiscent of former welcomes for Communist leaders for whom streets, public squares and towns were renamed and whose placards dominated all the key points. The colors of the flags and political manners have changed, it is true, but the mentality remains unchanged from the 1980s when Albanian demonstrators demanded that Kosovo become a part of the empire of Enver Hoxha.

Nevertheless, behind the raucous and festive façade of a happy Kosovo hides a far more tragic reality, one which neither Bill Clinton nor the numerous other diplomatic visitors who come here for their one day "safaris" in Pristina wish to see. It is the reality of isolated Serb enclaves, children who cannot go to school out of fear for their safety, dug up cemeteries and desecrated churches. Is this the kind of Kosovo envisioned by the former Western leaders who initiated military intervention against Serbia? Wasn't the phrase most frequently repeated to justify the intervention that it was to enable the creation of a multiethnic society? If we judge success on the basis of that purported goal, Kosovo and Metohija is less multiethnic today than it has ever been in its long history. It is the patent absurdity of the Kosovo peacekeeping mission that the southern Serbian province, which has been under the rule of the UN Mission and NATO forces for the past four years, represents the most unstable part of the Balkans, a perpetual hothouse of ethnic violence, organized crime and drug smuggling

While Ibrahim Rugova persistently attempts to prove to his Albanian compatriots and, very likely, to himself, that the billboards advertising "Winston" cigarettes and the plethora of U.S. flags are a sure indicator of economic progress and democratization of Kosovo, extremists continue their activities, not even sparing the Serbian children of Gorazdevac who were unable to go to the Montenegrin seaside like tens of thousands of Kosovo Albanians but sought refreshment from the summer heat in the small river next to their village.

During his visit to the Pristina airport of Slatina, on Pristina streets and at the University, Bill Clinton today met only Albanians, heard only the Albanian language and saw only the monoethnic society that represents the strongest evidence of the (lack of) justification for his policy toward the Balkans. At Pristina University Clinton accepted an honorary doctorate without asking himself why no Serbian students or professors were present. Perhaps the former president would not have even cared if he had known they were not there. For him, like for so many other Western politicians, all residents of Kosovo and Metohija are one amorphous mass of half-civilized "Kosovars" whose misfortune served just in time as a means of realizing far broader strategic interests and goals of the most powerful countries in the world.

At the end Mr. Clinton did not forget to make a few statements calling for ethnic reconciliation. But he explained the acts of violence committed against Serbs and non-Albanian minorities after the war exclusively as acts of revange "which deserve understanding but not justification", as he explained during his previous visit to Kosovo in November 1999. Speaking of "vengeance which belongs only to God" to people among which a large majority turns a blind eye towards massacres of innocent Serb children (Gorazdevac, Aug 03) or entire families (Obilic, June 03) can very easily be understood as an attempt to interpret systematic campaing of ethnic terror as a natural consequence of frustration - "OK, dear "Kosovars" you had enough, let the rest into the hands of the Almighty". But the Lord is teaching us that any crime, especially against the innocent, is a crime against God himself and that any attempt to rationalize a crime becomes a crime itself.

The reception Bill Clinton got today in Pristina is certainly one he would not have gotten anywhere else. Whenever he has visited Europe, he has been met by masses of demonstrators protesting his retrograde policies which have inflicted damage to the U.S. and Europe alike. The fact that a politician of considerable political and moral disrepute has been greeted by such ovations in Kosovo, overrun during the last four years of international "peace" by lawlessness and crimes against the weak and defenseless, perhaps is only becoming for Clinton at the end of his political career.

Editorial by
Fr. Sava (Janjic)

TOP


REUTERS: KOSOVO STILL LACKING DEMOCRACY, SAYS NEW GOVERNOR
"The pain in Kosovo has not disappeared... It is still very much the same as it was four years ago but other big international conflicts and challenges have taken the interest of the media...and also the governments."

TOP


Reuters
September 18, 2003


ROME -- Thursday -- The new UN governor for Kosovo said on Thursday Kosovo's Albanian majority had some way to go before it achieved the democratic standards that diplomats believe are a precondition to possible independence. Harri Holkeri, a former Finnish prime minister, told Reuters that the economic and crime situation in the disputed province were still alarming, more than four years after NATO's bombing campaign drove Serb troops from the territory.

"The pain in Kosovo has not disappeared," Holkeri, who took up his post last month, said during a brief visit to Rome.

"It is still very much the same as it was four years ago but other big international conflicts and challenges have taken the interest of the media...and also the governments."

Holkeri said both the United Nations and some NATO states wanted to downsize their operations in Kosovo in the medium-term but he refused to be drawn on whether the UN protectorate would eventually become an independent state.

"The final decision concerning the status of Kosovo can only be made by the (United Nations') Security Council, not by local institutions," he said. "I will not speculate on this."

Kosovo wants independence from Belgrade, but the international community has so far supported only substantial autonomy, fearing further fragmentation of the Balkans after the ethnic wars that destroyed the old Yugoslavia.

Holkeri said Kosovo's two million ethnic Albanians, who make up 90 percent of the province's population, had to resolve their internal problems before focusing on their future position.

"People are increasingly accepting the fact that the standards they are building for the society must happen before something can be done to finalise their situation," he said.

Three major issues

Holkeri's predecessor Michael Steiner laid down eight benchmarks to judge the progress of the Kosovo Albanians. Of these, the new UN governor said only three big issues really mattered - the rule of law, ethnic relations and the economy.

He decried the spread of organised crime in the region and said the economy was in a "bad" way, with an unemployment rate of 57 percent and locals unwilling to invest in their province.

"Kosovars must show confidence in their economy and invest their own money in it...then I'm sure we'll find ways and means to get international investors to show keen interest," he said.

In one positive development, Holkeri said that the first talks between Belgrade and Kosovo's Albanian leadership since the NATO bombing campaign should open before the end of October.

Representatives of the six major powers in the so-called Contact Group - the United States, France, Russia, Britain, Germany and Italy - are due to meet in New York on September 23 to discuss preparations for the talks.

"If everything goes as I hope we can call the opening of the dialogue, let's say in a couple of weeks," said Holkeri, who met Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini and also the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Ruud Lubbers, during his visit.

"If I get the backing, I will move, very, very rapidly."

Diplomats expect that the meeting will open in Brussels, Vienna or Rome before shifting to Belgrade and Pristina.

The agenda will focus on four main areas - energy, transport and telecoms, cooperation in returning Serb refugees and cooperation on missing persons - but not the final status.

Holkeri said he would not act as a mediator in the talks but said he saw himself as "some kind of a mid-wife".

"I try to move forward in a very pragmatic way. There are plenty of things that are almost impossible to do, but there are tasks that can be done and I try to do what's do-able," he said.

TOP


NYT: CLINTON, ON A VISIT TO KOSOVO, WARNS AGAINST "GETTING EVEN"
"My Bible says that vengeance belongs to God." He added that reconciliation was "the only way you can achieve a secure, stable and prosperous Kosovo."

TOP

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/09/20/international/europe/20CLIN.html

THE NEW YORK TIMES
September 20, 2003

By NICHOLAS WOOD

PRISTINA, Kosovo, Sept. 19 - Former President Bill Clinton was welcomed with acclaim here today, more than four years after NATO troops first entered this province, effectively ending two years of conflict and placing it under a United Nations mandate.

The visit was arranged so Mr. Clinton could receive an honorary degree and visit American soldiers serving with the United Nations peace-keeping force.

Hundreds of people lined the roadside and waved flags in greeting the former president on the four-and-a-half-mile journey from the airport to the center of the city.

Few other politicians could expect the same reception. Mr. Clinton, who last visited in 1999, is seen by the province's ethnic Albanian majority as being responsible for ending Yugoslav rule in the province, and taking it effectively a step closer to independence. The city's largest boulevard is named in his honor.

While four years of United Nations rule have brought comparative peace to the region, ethnic violence remains a problem. The last three months have seen an increase in attacks on the Serbian minority.

Mr. Clinton used his visit to warn Albanians that those seeking revenge for atrocities committed by Serbian and Yugoslav forces during the late 1990's could hinder the prospects for independence. "Do you want to get even?" he asked an invited audience at Pristina University, "I hope not. My Bible says that vengeance belongs to God." He added that reconciliation was "the only way you can achieve a secure, stable and prosperous Kosovo."

Kosovo's sovereignty has been in limbo since the end of the war. Security Council Resolution 1244, which established the United Nations administration, states that the province is still part of Yugoslavia. Its final status was to be tackled once the United Nations had established substantial self-autonomy.

Ethnic Albanian leaders and members of the Serbian government are preparing for preliminary talks on the province's future later this month. Serbian leaders oppose any kind of move toward an independent state.

Mr. Clinton also used the occasion to add to the debate on American troop commitments in the Balkans saying, "I think we belong here until our job is finished."

His remarks follow the statement from the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, General Richard B. Myers, that the Pentagon was reconsidering its troop deployments around the world, including the Balkans, because of the increased demands on American forces in Iraq and Afghanistan.

On Saturday, Mr. Clinton travels to Bosnia where he will attend a memorial service for 7,000 Bosnian Muslims massacred by Serbian forces in Srebrenica, the worst atrocity in Europe since World War II.

TOP


AFP: MACEDONIA BRACES FOR INCREASE IN ETHNIC ALBANIAN SEPARATISM

The ANA guerrillas say they want to establish, through war if necessary, a state grouping all ethnic Albanians living in the region: in Albania, Kosovo, Macedonia, southern Serbia and Montenegro.

TOP

Macedonia braces for increase in ethnic Albanian separatism Friday, 19-Sep-2003 4:10AM Jean-Eudes Barbier

SKOPJE, Sept 19 (AFP) - The authorities in Macedonia are expecting an increase in ethnic Albanian separatists' activities, particularly from the Albanian National Army (ANA), an underground militant group which wants to unify the ethnic community throughout the Balkans.

A recent increase in violence, claimed by the ANA, could be linked to expected negotiations between Serbia and ethnic Albanian leaders in the UN-administrated Kosovo, a senior Macedonian official said.

"We will assist the start of this process that would lead to a definition of Kosovo's status, something everyone in the Balkans is interested in," the official, who did not want to be named, told AFP in Skopje.

But "for the Albanians in the region, a final countdown, but backward one, will begin," the official insisted.

The ANA guerrillas say they want to establish, through war if necessary, a state grouping all ethnic Albanians living in the region: in Albania, Kosovo, Macedonia, southern Serbia and Montenegro.

Macedonian officials, faced with the recent wave of attacks, fear futher violence.

The clandestine group is "well-implanted in the region," with its "armed" cells in the field, mainly in Kosovo and with a "liaison officer" in Albania, the official said.

"Some of the fighters operate in uniform," he said.

The radical militants first appeared in 2000, grouping some former members of the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA), a guerrilla movement fighting troops under the command of ex-Yugoslav president Slobodan Milosevic during tehe 1998-99 Kosovo war.

Following the end of the NATO air war against Belgrade in June 1999, international officials administrating the southern Serbian province ordered a dissolution of the KLA, but some of its most militant fighters reportedly joined the ANA.

In 2001, ANA fighters were said to join ethnic Albanian rebels of the Macedonia-based guerrilla group the National Liberation Army (NLA), clashing with Skopje security forces during over seven months of conflict which almost led this former Yugoslav republic into civil war.

The conflict ended with the Western-brokered peace accord between the main Macedonian and ethnic Albanian parties in August 2001, but ANA separatists denounced the agreement and reaffirmed their resolve to "liberate" the Albanians from "Serb and Macedonian colonialists."

The ANA was classified as a terrorist organisation by the United Nations administration of Kosovo after it claimed responsibility for the sabotage of a railway bridge in the north of the province in April.

Most Albanian political leaders in the region have distanced themselves from the shadowy group, composed of disparate fractions, often linked with organized crime, and without wide support within its ethnic community.

Many Albanians however fear a "reactivation" of the rebel groups in Macedonia, warning of a "lack of will" from the Skopje government to "substantially" improve their living conditions.

They warn that the extremist movements could escalate their campaigns even in Kosovo if the international community complies with Belgrade's refusal to recognize ethnic Albanian calls for independence.

And the ANA guerrillas have remained firm in their calls to unite all ethnic Albanians living in the Balkans.

"The formation of an ethnic Albanian state is the only solution to ensure stability in the Balkans and we will intensify our efforts to achieve this goal," the ANA said in a recent statement.


TOP


INTIMIDATING MESSAGES SPREAD AGAINST UNMIK STAFF
According to the police information, the return of the corpses of two AKSH members is requested in the messages; on the contrary, attack campaign will begin against crucial UNMIK officials.

TOP

BOTA SOT, Albanian language daily
Pristina, September 19, 2003

Police sources confirmed that they have received the past couple of days intimidating messages addressed against the UNMIK staff in several cases in Pristina region.
The police have found those messages posted in five UNMIK police vehicles.

According to the police information, the return of the corpses of two AKSH* members is requested in the messages; on the contrary, attack campaign will begin against crucial UNMIK officials.

The police did not give further details regarding this case, except that the case is under investigation.
 

*AKSH - ANA - Albanian National Army - a shaddowy militant group of ethnic Albanian extremists who struggle for territorial unification of all, what they call, Albanian inhabited lands in the Balkans. ANA was officially proclaimed a terrorist organization in spring 2003 by UNMIK chief Micheal Steiner after a terrorist attack on a railway bridge in North Kosovo.

TOP


GENERAL MINI: KOSOVO'S STABILITY IS CRUCIAL FOR STABILITY OF THE REGION

The so-called organization AKSH has only criminal purposes and not positive projects for a better Kosovo for the Albanians. They have their criminal force, and they have nothing to offer, but they only follow their interests. They aim to destabilize the region and bring back the war. They strive to reach their criminal goals, and they do not care for the people or the country. We are fighting against this, and with the good understanding of Kosovo people, we will triumph.

TOP

BOTA SOT, Albanian language daily
Pristina, September 19, 2003

Bota Sot: Based on the details and information you posses, could the so-called "Albanian National Army" (AKSH) provoke a new war in the western Balkans?

General Fabio Mini: The so-called organization AKSH has only criminal purposes and not positive projects for a better Kosovo for the Albanians. They have their criminal force, and they have nothing to offer, but they only follow their interests. They aim to destabilize the region and bring back the war. They strive to reach their criminal goals, and they do not care for the people or the country. We are fighting against this, and with the good understanding of Kosovo people, we will triumph.

Bota Sot: It was said that KFOR and UNMIK police were invited to investigate the potential involvement or relation of KPC (Kosovo Protection Corps) ranking members with AKSH. Is this true and did you undertake such investigation?

General Fabio Mini: KFOR did not undertake such interventions. We have presented our evaluation and proposal to the UN SRSG. We will propose concrete steps for the development of KPC and for its structural changes. Our current suggestions for suspension are only administrative actions with a purpose of expelling people that obstruct the troops’ development, and which believe that the troops are their private business. Department of Justice and Police will deal with the ones that would be identified and suspected of leading criminal activities, or the ones that are related to terrorism.

Bota Sot: Do you think Kosovo is still a strategic zone for NATO?

General Fabio Mini: NATO strategy is a strategy of extension and security, expansion of cooperation, and participation. In this direction, Kosovo is crucial for the security of the Balkans, and it is a crucial region for the security. Kosovo cannot be seen isolated and its stability is essential for the stability of the region. But, this does not mean that NATO, Europe, or the global community could be held hostage by the ones that want Kosovo as a strategic tool for destabilization.

Bota Sot: Currently, the border issue between Kosovo and Serbia is very delicate. Do you believe this issue presents difficulty for KFOR and your mandate?

General Fabio Mini: There is no reason. The border issue should be solved through the proper legal framework. KFOR is here in the name of the international community and it will reinforce the decisions of the international community. My only concern is the intolerance and the manipulation of this matter, which has taken place inside and outside Kosovo and which is obstructing the freedom of movement of the citizens. And, this is a challenge for the stability.

Bota Sot: Kosovo's final status has remained an open issue. Do you think that the West is in a lack of political response for the future of Kosovo?

General Fabio Mini: It is not a matter of political response, but rather of creating conditions for certain response. Kosovo's final status, regardless what would it be, should not considered as final in order to be successful. A solution should be seen in the context of "future status" of the region within Europe. The international community gave a right to the political response. It would be seen if the conditions for regional stability, cooperation and economic integration are present. It should be clear what remains to be done and in which dimensions the current leadership is working to get to this solution.

Bota Sot: The arms amnesty was announced in Kosovo this month. Do you believe that that the time to say ‘no’ to arms has arrived in Kosovo now?

General Fabio Mini: Arms amnesty is a chance to construct the confidence and to save the people from the arm possession culture. More than ever the time has arrived now. The international community is observing from close the improvements in this field. The arms are not indispensable and in this society we want a development in Kosovo, and the arms are unneeded, but they present a challenge for the acceptance of new Kosovo by the international community.

Bota Sot: Prior to your departure from here, do you want to arrest a certain person that could be suspected of being involved in war crimes in Kosovo. Did you receive such request by The Hague Tribunal?

General Fabio Mini: I cannot comment on this. However, you should be certain that KFOR would cooperate tightly with The Hague for executing the warrant-arrests or receiving orders. Unfortunately, the subject for war crimes should still be fulfilled by the investigations in all ethnicities that were involved in the crimes against the humanity.

Bota Sot: According to you, which are the future perspectives for peace and security in Kosovo?

General Fabio Mini: Only through the internal integration, tolerance, and cooperation. The effort for common real solutions will begin to happen only if the actions triumph over the words, if the confidence wins over the propaganda, and also through the cooperation in regional level.

TOP


INET - KOSOVO AND METOHIJA FLASH NEWS, SEP 19
ERP KIM info service subarticle

TOP

www.inet.co.yu

I*Net News, Belgrade
KOSOVO AND METOHIJA NEWS


Friday 19 September 2003

22:00 The trial against Serb National Council of Northern Kosovo president Dr. Milan Ivanovic and SNC member Nebojsa Jovic is to begin on Monday at the District Court in northern Kosovska Mitrovica, confirmed Jovic's attorney, Ljubomir Pantovic, today. Ivanovic and Jovic are charged with committing serious violence and aggravated assault and battery in the incident between UNMIK police and citizens that occurred at the main bridge over the Ibar River on April 8, 2002. In addition to the joint indictment, Jovic is also charged with attacking a police officer.

21:40 The return of Kosovo Serbs to Podujevo has been stopped due to announcements by local Albanians that they will destroy the houses intended for returnees, stated the president of the Vidovdan Association of Serb Refugees from Kosovo, Caslav Bojovic.

21:20 Former US president Bill Clinton arrived for a one day visit to Kosovo today, where he will receive an honorary doctorate from Pristina University and visit US soldiers in the US military base Bondsteel near Urosevac.

21:00 Kosovo parliament speaker Nexhad Daci stated that those people who accept Kosovo as their homeland can return and that every citizen of Kosovo must be on his own property.

20:40 The head of the British office in Pristina Mark Dickinson stated that the return of displaced persons is the most important issue in Kosovo and that all refugees must return and be provided with a certain level of security acceptable to them.

20:20 A change in the status of the province of Kosovo would have negative consequences for Bosnia and Herzegovina because it would open up the issue of the status of the Croatian and Serbian peoples in Bosnia, stated Bosnia and Herzegovina foreign minister Mladen Ivanic said.

20:00 Serbian premier Zoran Zivkovic stated that the Kosovo Albanians do not want dialogue on the status of the Province because such negotiations would topple their dream of independence.

19:40 Serbian deputy premier Nebojsa Covic called on all participants of the future dialogue on Kosovo- to stop thinking about the final status of the Province and turn toward practical issues.

13:00 Italian foreign minister Franco Frattini and UNMIK head Harri Holkeri signed a memorandum in Rome regarding Italy's 3.5 million euro contribution to the UNMIK program for the return of Serb refugees to the Province, advised the Italian Foreign Minsitry yesterday.

12:40 Today Serb Return Coalition (Povratak) MP in the Kosovo parliament Randjel Nojkic accused parliamentary speaker Nexhat Daci of continued discrimination against Serb MPs, denying them the right to present their views at parliamentary sessions.

12:20 MPs of the three biggest Albanian parties in the Kosovo- parliament assessed yesterday that dialogue with Belgrade is not a priority for Kosovo, whereas economic development and reduction of social tensions are priorities.

12:00 The dialogue on Kosovo is expected to begin during the period from the first week of October to the first week of November, without insistance on discussing the final status of the Province, and Vienna or Brussels have been mentioned as possible venues, either option being acceptable to the Belgrade government, stated Coordinating Center for Kosovo and Metohija head Nebojsa Covic.

11:40 Serbian premier Zoran Zivkovic stated that Serbian deputy premier and Coordinating Center for Kosovo and Metohija head Nebojsa Covic will head the team for talks on Kosovo and Metohija since he had been dealing with the problems of the Province for two and a half years.


TOP


ERP KIM Info-Service is the official Information Service of the Serbian Orthodox Diocese of Raska and Prizren and works with the blessing of His Grace Bishop Artemije.
Our Information Service is distributing news on Kosovo related issues. The main focus of the Info-Service is the life of the Serbian Orthodox Church and the Serbian community in the Province of Kosovo and Metohija. ERP KIM Info Service works in cooperation with www.serbian-translation.com as well as the Kosovo Daily News (KDN) News List

Disclaimer:
The views expressed by the authors of newspaper articles or other texts which are not official communiqués or news reports by the Diocese are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of the Serbian Orthodox Church

SUBSCRIBE TO ERPKIM NEWSLETTERS: /erpkim_mailinglists.html

Our Newsletters are available on our ERP KIM Info-service Web-Page:
/erpkiminfo.html

Additional information on our Diocese and the life of the Kosovo Serb Community may be found at:

Copyright 2003, ERP KIM Info-Service