October 17, 2003

ERP KIM Newsletter 17-10-03


Ibrahim Rugova
Lack of responsible political vision behind
façade of pretentious rhetoric

 POLITICAL GRANDSTANDING INSTEAD OF CONSTRUCTIVE DIALOGUE

Neither Ibrahim Rugova nor any other Kosovo Albanian leader, especially the former UCK militants-cum-politicians who refused to participate in the dialogue, seem to have any clear idea or intention to sincerely work on improving the living conditions for all their non-Albanian citizens. Their interest, in fact, remains solely focused on creating an ethnic Albanian state where there will be no place for any other ethnic groups and religions, and which will be tailored only for the ethnic Albanians.

"The matter is especially about different political leaders in Kosovo, who disappointed us with their unconstructive stances, their political postures as well as with their positions full of prejudices and indignity."

Larry Rossin, US State Department high ranking official, after the first round of Vienna talks
Voice of America, October 14, 2003 (Quoted by Kosovo Albanian Information Center QIK, Oct 15)

Editorial by
Fr. Sava Janjic

The Vienna meeting between the delegation of the Serbian Government and the ethnic Albanian leaders of Serbia's southern province of Kosovo was more than a disappointment. UNMIK's chief Harri Holkery brought only an ethnic Albanian delegation excluding a Serb and ethnic Turk representatives in the last moment, reportedly on the request of Rugova himself. This exactly gave an opportunity to Ibrahim Rugova to make impression that all residents of the Province share his extreme and uncompromising views and that Kosovo belongs solely to ethnic Albanians. In fact, composition of the "ethnically clean Kosovo delegation" in Vienna was exactly reflecting the present situation in the Province in which Serbs and other smaller communities were brutally cleansed by Albanian extremists and their representatives in UN sponosred institutions reduced to insignificant political factor.

The beginning of the official dialogue was expected to have been focused on practical issues: transportation and communications, energy, missing persons, and the return of Serb refugees to Kosovo. Most of all, both delegations were expected to demonstrate responsible and constructive positions, which will finally get things moving in a positive direction after a four year-long standstill.

According to the position of the international community and the Belgrade Government, it is not yet time to address Kosovo's final status before standards have been achieved. Kosovo Province is not free for all its residents; ethnic discrimination and crimes still keep the majority of the remaining Serbs in isolated ghettoes, and the Province has become the Mecca of the Albanian mafia, drug dealers and pimps. The fate of thousands of missing Serbs and Albanians remains unknown, and 250,000 Serbs who fled from the terror of Kosovo Albanian extremists (the KLA or UCK) after the war still are not allowed to return to their destroyed homes. Serbian private property is being systematically usurped, and more than 100 Serbian Orthodox Churches have been reduced to ashes by Albanian Moslem extremists seeking to destroy all traces of the centuries-old Christian tradition in Kosovo and rewrite the history of the region. In short, the problems in Kosovo are huge and it was high time to sit at the negotiating table and engage in responsible dialogue to bring hope in a better future to the Province's desperate inhabitants.

The Belgrade delegation came to Vienna with a concrete set of proposals to improve the lives of all residents of the Province and create a much better atmosphere for making decisions on the final status when that time arrives. With almost no capability of influencing developments in its Province, Belgrade is hardly in a position to improve the situation there. The ball is in the court of UNMIK and ethnic Albanian leaders, who still apparently cannot restrain extremism and ethnic violence despite a NATO military presence. However, the speech of the leading Kosovo Albanian representative Ibrahim Rugova showed that the Albanian delegation had come to Vienna with completely different goals. Instead of displaying a modicum of readiness to constructively address the improvement of living conditions for Kosovo's non-Albanian citizens, Mr. Rugova used the floor for yet another session of political grandstanding. His grotesque speech was obviously directed to his electorate instead of his collocutors.  Even the leading U.S. representative at the opening session, Larry Rossin, in his comment for "Voice of America", expressed his own disappointment with the Albanian leaders, criticizing "their unconstructive stances, political postures, and positions full of prejudices and indignity".

Most Kosovo Albanians expected a new Dayton or Rambouillet conference where the United States and European countries would simply impose Kosovo independence and force Serbia to relinquish a part of its territory, leaving its people and historical and cultural monuments to the mercy of Kosovo Albanians. However, times have changed. The Belgrade Government is no longer headed by Milosevic but by his political opponents, who are struggling to bring Serbia into European Union and NATO. The ethnic Albanians insisted on U.S. mediation and facilitation of the talks with Belgrade. However, the U.S. Ambassador in Belgrade, one of the U.S. representatives in the Vienna talks, stated clearly for "Radio Free Europe" that this was not going to happen. He explained that the U.S. will facilitate the process, but would leave it to UNMIK to lead it. In fact, the will of the international community is that Belgrade and Pristina finally engage in open dialogue and reach a negotiated solution themselves, which is exactly what Kosovo Albanian leaders have always tried to avoid.

In the very beginning of his speech, Mr. Rugova referred to Kosovo as already an independent state regardless the common agreement that the status issue would not be on the agenda, and that Kosovo is officially a part of Serbia-Montenegro according to UN Security Council Resolution 1244 and Serbia's Constitution. Furthermore, Mr. Rugova blatantly stated that "public security was good" despite frequently reoccurring attacks on Serbs, and the failure of UNMIK police investigators to resolve a single one of the major crimes committed against Serbs after the war. Mr. Rugova lavished praise on multiethnic local institutions but neglected to mention that  Serb deputies are still commonly brought to official meetings in UNMIK police vehicles and frequently exposed to open ethnic discrimination even by the Kosovo parliamentary speaker - Nedxhad Daci, who accompanied Rugova to Vienna. During the past two years, Serb deputies were unable to bring about almost any improvement for their community because the Albanian majority blocked every constructive proposal. Kosovo Serbs agreed to participate in Provincial institutions hoping that UNMIK would make them a tool for achieving genuine multiethnicity. However, Albanians understood these institutions primarily as a tools for achieving their ethnic state regardless the will of other ethnic communities.

Mr. Rugova also did not mention that Serb residents of Kosovo cannot normally receive medical treatment in Albanian-run hospitals, that there are no Serb students or professors at Pristina University, and that almost every major Kosovo city remains virtually without its Serb population. In all truth, it would be hard to expect Mr. Rugova to address these problems because Kosovo Albanian leaders hardly ever visit Serb enclaves to help them resolve their problems. Mr. Rugova is the prime example of a virtual politician, usually spending his days posing with foreign dignitaries and diplomats in his kitschy lounge. Outside of his luxurious villa is a reality about which he hardly knows - or wants to know - anything.

In Vienna Mr. Rugova did not mention a single word on how to improve security, facilitate the return of refugees, improve the disastrous human rights situation or protect the endangered Serb cultural heritage. Apparently none of these burning issues were worth mentioning at all. In fact, his entire speech was directly intended to falsely present Kosovo as a "success story". Neither he nor any other Kosovo Albanian leader, especially the former UCK militants-cum-politicians who refused to participate in the dialogue, seem to have any clear idea or intention to sincerely work on improving the living conditions for all their citizens. Their interest, in fact, remains solely focused on creating an ethnic Albanian state where there will be no place for any other ethnic groups and religions, and which will be tailored only for the ethnic Albanians.

In short, the positions of the Kosovo Albanian delegates in Vienna clearly proved that they represent only their own ethnic group and not all residents of Kosovo. The institutions which they claimed to legitimately represent proved once again as nothing but a façade of false or non-existent multiethnicity.

With one group of Kosovo Albanian leaders opposing the dialogue and the other, headed with Rugova, engaging in political grandstanding, Kosovo leaders clearly demonstrated serious lack of fundamental political responsibility and wisdom. The other possible explanation might be that the roles were craftily shared beforehand: While "bad guys" Thaci and Haradinaj with their UCK/AKSH gangs intensify pressure against Serbs and international personnel threatening to start a war if their extreme requests were not fulfilled, Rugova and Daci (as "good guys") come to Vienna with "the only possible solution" - unconditional recognition of Kosvo's independence. What makes both blocks united is their wish to make Kosovo independent Albanian state without implementation of elementary democratic and human rights standards, particularly for the non-Albanian population.

The Belgrade Government and the international community should, therefore, insist that the continuation of the dialogue focuses on practical issues, and make it very clear to Albanian leaders that the Vienna dialogue was not intended for political propaganda and tricks but for constructive negotiations to bring all of Kosovo's residents a peaceful life, security, protection of private property, freedom of worship, and all other standards of a democratic society. Only then it would be possible to address the issue of the final status but not under the pressure of threats and violence but according to the international standards and political maturity of either side. Any other approach would be completely wrong because unilateral secession of Kosovo would inevitably lead to destabilization of the entire region and desintegration of Bosnia-Hercegovina and Macedonia.

Gracanica, October 16, 2003

==============================================================

CONTENTS:

Ethnic violence continues:

EXPLOSIONS IN LIPLJAN, MOLOTOV COCKTAIL THROWN IN BRESJE
In Bresje near Kosovo Polje a group of ethnic Albanians returning from today's protest meeting in Pristina set fire to a shed on the property of (Kosovo Serb) Velibor Velickovic. Several young men came out of a VW Golf sporting an Albanian flag and threw a Molotov cocktail at the building, located close to the main road from Pristina to Pec, eyewitnesses reported.

UNFRIENDLY FIRST MEETING BETWEEN SERBS AND KOSOVARS
Leaders of Serbia and the breakaway province of Kosovo yesterday met face to face in their first bid to reopen communication closed since the 1999 war.

BELGRADE SAVES TALKS IN VIENNA
Covic Added that Belgrade is ready to talk on Kosovo's status, but added that changes in borders would mean independent Kosovo. He warned that such an act could cause a destabilization of the entire region. "If democratic Albanians from Kosovo have the right to determine for themselves some kind of independent Kosovo, then the same right has to granted to the democratic Serbs from Bosnia. God knows what will happen in Macedonia," stated the chief of the Coordination Center.

ROSSIN DISSAPOINTED WITH UNCONSTRUCTIVE STANCES OF SOME KOSOVO ALBANIAN LEADERS

A high-ranking official of the US State Department expressed disappointment towards the stance of the Albanian politicians related to the talks in Vienna. Larry Rossini, Assistant Deputy Secretary of State, who represented US in the talks between Pristina and Belgrade, declared to the "Voice of America" that the stance of the Albanian political representatives was unconstructive. Mr. Rossini was very blunt in his comments regarding this issue. "The matter is especially about different political leaders in Kosovo, who disappointed us with their unconstructive stances, their political postures as well as with their positions full of prejudices and indignity," stated Rossin.

NEW YORK TIMES - AN ETHNIC WAR THAT STILL RAGES
As an ethnic-Serbian traffic officer who works just over the border in Macedonia told me: "I wouldn't go to Pristina. I'd get my throat cut. The Albanians there hate us." This view is echoed by the 200 or so ethnic Serbs who still live in this city. They stayed home when Mr. Clinton spoke - in fact, they don't go out much at all, and with good reason. In August, two
ethnic-Serbian children were killed and four wounded by machine-gun fire while swimming in a stream 50 miles south of here. A few days later, two ethnic-Serbian men were slaughtered by ax-wielding assailants in the enclaves outside Pristina to which so Serbs many have fled for safety.


UNMIK POLICE MAKES RECORD HEROIN SEIZURE IN KOSOVO
This is the largest seizure of heroin in the past four years and follows the successful interdiction of 18 kilograms of heroin valued at 800,000 Euros in Gjilan region on 27th July 2003.


PERPETRATORS OF GORAZDEVAC MASSACRE STILL NOT ARRESTED - DAY 63...


More News Available on our:

KOSOVO DAILY NEWS LIST (KDN)
KDN Archive

This newsletter is available on our ERP KIM Web-site:
/erpkiminfo.html

ALBANIAN PROTESTS IN PRISTINA AGAINST
SERB-ALBANIAN DIALOGUE IN VIENNA


Thousands of Kosovo Albanians protest in Pristina against talks between Serbian and Kosovo Albanian leaders who met in Vienna for their first talks since the 1999 war, October 14, 2003.Talks between Albanians and Serbs are modestly aimed at settling practical issues like power supply and refugee returns rather than whether Kosovo will be independent, but people do not seem to have much faith that they will even get that far. REUTERS/ Hazir Reka


EXPLOSIONS IN LIPLJAN, MOLOTOV COCKTAIL THROWN IN BRESJE

In Bresje near Kosovo Polje a group of ethnic Albanians returning from today's protest meeting in Pristina set fire to a shed on the property of (Kosovo Serb) Velibor Velickovic. Several young men came out of a VW Golf sporting an Albanian flag and threw a Molotov cocktail at the building, located close to the main road from Pristina to Pec, eyewitnesses reported.

TOP


Beta News Agency, Belgrade
October 14, 2003

LIPLJAN - A powerful explosion occurred today at approximately 14,00 hours in Ciganjska Mahala, a part of Lipljan inhabited by Serbs and Albanians. Serbian sources reported that there were no human casualties; however, the material damage is great.

At the entrance to the Serb village of Dobrotin near Lipljan, KFOR soldiers used a controlled detonation at about 17,00 hours to destroy an explosive device discovered by local residents.

In Bresje near Kosovo Polje a group of ethnic Albanians returning from today's protest meeting in Pristina set fire to a shed on the property of (Kosovo Serb)
Velibor Velickovic .

Several young men came out of a VW Golf sporting an Albanian flag and threw a Molotov cocktail at the building, located close to the main road from Pristina to Pec, eyewitnesses reported.

Thanks to the composure of the Serbs of Bresje, the fire was quickly brought under control and there was only slight material damage.

The incident was reported to UNMIK police, which conducted an investigation.

TOP


"UNFRIENDLY" FIRST MEETING FOR SERBS AND KOSOVARS
Leaders of Serbia and the breakaway province of Kosovo yesterday met face to face in their first bid to reopen communication closed since the 1999 war.

TOP

FINANCIAL TIMES, UK
By Eric Jansson in Vienna
Published: October 15 2003 5:00

Leaders of Serbia and the breakaway province of Kosovo yesterday met face to face in their first bid to reopen communication closed since the 1999 war.

For Balkan politicians still sharply divided over how to establish lasting peace in Kosovo, the meeting marked a brief return to a world diplomatic stage they occupied half a decade ago.

Billed as the "Belgrade-Pristina dialogue", the meeting was hosted by Austria's government in Vienna and mediated by United Nations officials, while Chris Patten and Javier Solana of the EU looked on.

Mr Solana, the EU's foreign policy chief, hailed the meeting as the start of a "very important journey", as Serb and Kosovar officials agreed to launch working groups focusing on issues including energy supplies, telecommunications, refugee returns and missing persons.

But troubles before and during the talks highlighted difficulties the international community will face as it aims to resolve the matter of Kosovo's attempted secession.

The province's ethnic Albanian majority strongly backs full independence, and Nato's intervention against Slobodan Milosevic's forces four years ago bolstered their position. But according to international law Kosovo remains part of Serbia.

While tensions between Belgrade and Pristina remain high, questions of the province's status remain off the agenda. But they still define the debate.

As on occasions before the Kosovo war, when western diplomats cajoled officials from Belgrade and Pristina to meet, yesterday's session opened with sharply worded speeches and quickly descended into "unfriendliness", a high-ranking Kosovar participant said.

Zoran Zivkovic, Serbia's prime minister, and Ibrahim Rugova, Kosovo's provisional president, emerged from the talks 15 minutes early and spoke resentfully of each other at separate press conferences.

Each attempted to link the other to Mr Milosevic, the former Yugoslav president now on trial in The Hague, whose hardline policies in Kosovo intensified old ethnic conflicts.

Mr Zivkovic accused Mr Rugova of refusing to open real dialogue. "When Mr Milosevic was in power, Mr Rugova spoke to him, but today he will not speak to the authorities in Belgrade."

Mr Rugova laughed off the barb and spat back that he saw "no difference between the previous regime [under Mr Milosevic] and the current government of Serbia".

Belgrade's team was also stung by last-minute changes to the Kosovo delegation. Kosovo's provisional prime minister stayed away, and political juggling later led to the complete exclusion of ethnic Serbs from the province's delegation.stigation.

TOP


BELGRADE SAVES TALKS IN VIENNA
Covic Added that Belgrade is ready to talk on Kosovo's status, but added that changes in borders would mean independent Kosovo. He warned that such an act could cause a destabilization of the entire region. "If democratic Albanians from Kosovo have the right to determine for themselves some kind of independent Kosovo, then the same right has to granted to the democratic Serbs from Bosnia. God knows what will happen in Macedonia," stated the chief of the Coordination Center.

TOP

BORBA DAILY, BELGRADE
October 15, 2003

On Wednesday, Nebojsa Covic, the president of the Coordination Center for Kosovo and Metohija, stated that Belgrade authorities "saved” the meeting with the Pristina delegation, which took place in Vienna.

During a press conference Covic told reporters that he is very proud of such an impact made by the Belgrade authorities.

He added that if the working groups ever meet they have to be multiethnic and that everything has to be done neatly, especially on a question such as the return of the Serbs and the other non-Albanians to the province.

He also pointed that the expose done by the US delegation during the Vienna talks was "extremely precise, fair and constructive".

According to him Belgrade is determined to primarily talk on the upgrading of the determined standards in Kosovo and then talks on its status, but that this act cannot be just buying time till all Serbs disappear from Kosovo.

Covic Added that Belgrade is ready to talk on Kosovo's status, but added that changes in borders would mean independent Kosovo.

He warned that such an act could cause a destabilization of the entire region.
"If democratic Albanians from Kosovo have the right to determine for themselves some kind of independent Kosovo, then the same right has to granted to the democratic Serbs from Bosnia. God knows what will happen in Macedonia," stated the chief of the Coordination Center.

Covic criticized the organizers of the meeting for cutting the transmission from the Vienna meeting adding that the interruption was not planned.

He also criticized UNMIK and the international community for not providing the participation of the minorities in the Pristina delegation, and evaluated that the Prishtina delegation was "ethnically cleansed".

Covic evaluated that inside the Albanian community on Kosovo there are disagreements and that the mild politicians are under strong influence and pressure from extremists connected with the organized crime.


TOP


ROSSIN DISAPPOINTED WITH UNCONSTRUCTIVE STANCES OF SOME KOSOVO POLITICIANS

A high-ranking official of the US State Department expressed disappointment towards the stance of the Albanian politicians related to the talks in Vienna. Larry Rossini, Assistant Deputy Secretary of State, who represented US in the talks between Pristina and Belgrade, declared to the "Voice of America" that the stance of the Albanian political representatives was unconstructive. Mr. Rossini was very blunt in his comments regarding this issue. "The matter is especially about different political leaders in Kosovo, who disappointed us with their unconstructive stances, their political postures as well as with their positions full of prejudices and indignity," stated Rossin.

TOP

QIC (Kosovo Information Center) in Albanian language
October 15, 2003


A high-ranking official of the US State Department expressed disappointment towards the stance of the Albanian politicians related to the talks in Vienna. Larry Rossini, Assistant Deputy Secretary of State, who represented US in the talks between Pristina and Belgrade, declared to the "Voice of America" that the stance of the Albanian political representatives was unconstructive. Mr. Rossini was very blunt in his comments regarding this issue.
"The matter is especially about different political leaders in Kosovo, who disappointed us with their unconstructive stances, their political postures as well as with their positions full of prejudices and indignity," stated Rossin.

Rossin also stated that with such stances they did not make a service to the people of Kosova. They, he said, listened to the people who did not give them good advice. Ambassador Rossini stated that he was relatively encouraged with the beginning of the dialogue between Prishtina and Belgrade.

“Naturally, each side expressed its own stances and political receptions during their opening declarations, but these are only technical talks. What was really needed here was an initiative to give a political push to the experts, who are to discuss the technical issues later,” Rossini said.

He said that this was the objective of this meeting, and according to his opinion, this goal was achieved. He reiterated that these talks are not discussions about the final status of Kosovo, but tehnical talks on tehnical isssues. A special process would deal with the final status when time comes, and this time has not come yet.

TOP


NYT - AN ETHNIC WAR THAT STILL RAGES
As an ethnic-Serbian traffic officer who works just over the border in
Macedonia told me: "I wouldn't go to Pristina. I'd get my throat cut. The
Albanians there hate us." This view is echoed by the 200 or so ethnic Serbs
who still live in this city. They stayed home when Mr. Clinton spoke - in
fact, they don't go out much at all, and with good reason. In August, two
ethnic-Serbian children were killed and four wounded by machine-gun fire
while swimming in a stream 50 miles south of here. A few days later, two
ethnic-Serbian men were slaughtered by ax-wielding assailants in the
enclaves outside Pristina to which so Serbs many have fled for safety.

TOP

THE NEW YORK TIMES,
Monday, October 14, 2003 OP-ED

By ANDREW ROSENBAUM

PRISTINA, Kosovo - Today in Vienna, the first-ever talks will begin between
the autonomous government of Kosovo and its former rulers in what we now
call Serbia and Montenegro. Although the participants say they will cover
only "technical matters," others have hinted at higher stakes. Bill Clinton
last month told cheering crowds here - there is a Bil Klinton Boulevard in
Pristina - that the talks could "create for the world a model of positive
interdependence." Richard Holbrooke, the Clinton administration's point man
on the Balkans, and Bernard Kouchner, the founder of Doctors Without
Borders, wrote in The Wall Street Journal that today's meeting "is the
beginning of something that could be very important."

Unfortunately, anyone who spends even a day walking the streets of Pristina
and its neighboring towns will come away convinced that peace is not to be
gleaned through diplomacy. The wounds of ethnic-Albanian majority and
ethnic-Serb minority alike have not healed, and the 12,000-plus NATO troops
here are simply stanching the bleeding by force.

As an ethnic-Serbian traffic officer who works just over the border in
Macedonia told me: "I wouldn't go to Pristina. I'd get my throat cut. The
Albanians there hate us." This view is echoed by the 200 or so ethnic Serbs
who still live in this city. They stayed home when Mr. Clinton spoke - in
fact, they don't go out much at all, and with good reason. In August, two
ethnic-Serbian children were killed and four wounded by machine-gun fire
while swimming in a stream 50 miles south of here. A few days later, two
ethnic-Serbian men were slaughtered by ax-wielding assailants in the
enclaves outside Pristina to which so Serbs many have fled for safety.

Yet many ethnic Albanians live in willful disbelief. "Look, there goes a
Serb," my ethnic-Albanian taxi driver, Abas Abazi, pointed out as we headed
through town. "You see, no one bothers him." But later, when we passed
through the Serb-dominated village of Shilovo, the streets are almost empty
at 10 in the morning. An old man herding goats waves us away. "Leave us
alone," he shouts.

Catherine Cocco, a United Nations aid worker, tells me: "When we bring Serbs
in to visit their old homes in Pristina, the buses are stoned. In their
enclaves, they listen avidly to hard-line Serbian radio stations that
proclaim the need for Kosovo to rejoin Serbia and Montenegro."

Why can't the NATO troops stop the killing? "Ours is a culture of guns,"
said a Kosovar police officer. More than 300,000 arms - about one gun per
household - are in circulation in Kosovo, according to the Small Arms Survey
project of Vienna. And we're not talking about Saturday Night Specials but
rather grenade launchers, Kalashnikovs and large-caliber pistols. "People
here need guns," Bashkim Pllano, a 25-year-old Albanian waiter at a
restaurant in central Pristina, told me. "We're all afraid of what might
happen."

And the unease is growing as the initial joy of independence has faded.
Virtually every block here sports a new building rising out of the rubble -
but with the first rush of aid money drying up, many are are unfinished and
abandoned. Bearded youths loiter on street corners, hoping to get jobs doing
manual labor at $11 a day. "We are waiting for some hope, but we are getting
tired of living in fear," Agim, a 28-year-old student who wouldn't give his
last name, told me.

There is no civil or commercial law, and searches by the NATO forces disrupt
day-to-day business. Near the town of Gjilani, Agim Avoiu, a 43-year-old
Albanian restaurant owner, sat forlornly at his empty establishment. "There
is a checkpoint outside Shilovo, and it makes it hard for people to get
here," he said. "And then they haven't much money; I've put my life savings
into this business, and now I don't know how long I can keep going."

Mr. Avoiu pins his hopes to Western companies investing in Kosovo, an
outlook shared by the prime minister, Bajram Rexhepi. "If we can attract
investment, we can create jobs, and jobs will bring stability and reduce
ethnic tension," he told me in a group interview. That is possible,
eventually, I suppose. But as long as Serb and Albanian Kosovars settle
their disputes with guns, foreign investment is a moot point.

"What is needed," said Ms. Cocco, the aid worker, "is an independent
tribunal that will punish ethnic murderers on both sides. When Kosovans see
these criminals brought to justice, they will stop killing each other. Then
we can get all the Kosovans to work together to help rebuild this place."

She has a point: with an independent tribunal to punish the worst killers on
each side and seek reconciliation, perhaps calls to end the violence by
political and religious leaders will come to have some legitimacy. Perhaps
then the outlook of the people on the Pristina streets would come to have
more in common with that of the politicians gathering in Vienna.


Andrew Rosenbaum writes frequently on European politics and business.

TOP


UNMIK POLICE SEIZED 36 KILOGRAMS OF HEROIN IN KOSOVO AT THE BORDER CROSSING FROM ALBANIA
This is the largest seizure of heroin in the past four years and follows the successful interdiction of 18 kilograms of heroin valued at 800,000 Euros in Gjilan region on 27th July 2003.

TOP

UNMIK POLICE
POLICE MAKE RECORD HEROIN SEIZURE

Police seized almost 36 kilograms of a substance believed to be heroin as a result of a vehicle search in Prizren on Thursday, 9th October 2003.

The Opel Omega car, bearing Austrian registration, was stopped in a routine check by Border Police at the Vrbnica border crossing as it entered Kosovo from Albania.

Officers became suspicious of the vehicle and its three occupants and all were taken to Prizren Police Station where a detailed search could be made.

Concealed within the body of the car were found numerous packets containing a material that preliminary tests have identified as heroin.

The three male occupants of the car, one Kosovo Albanian and two Albanians, were arrested and are being held in custody.

The street value of these drugs in Western Europe is approximately 1,5 million Euros.

This is the largest seizure of heroin in the past four years and follows the successful interdiction of 18 kilograms of heroin valued at 800,000 Euros in Gjilan region on 27th July 2003.

This seizure is a result of good police work and we will continue to direct our efforts at such organised criminal activity.


Derek CHAPPELL
Chief Press Office,

Angela JOSEPH
MHQ Deputy Chief Press Office, MHQ

UNMIK POLICE PRISTINA


TOP


ERP KIM Info-Service is the official Information Service of the Serbian Orthodox Diocese of Raska and Prizren and works with the blessing of His Grace Bishop Artemije.
Our Information Service is distributing news on Kosovo related issues. The main focus of the Info-Service is the life of the Serbian Orthodox Church and the Serbian community in the Province of Kosovo and Metohija. ERP KIM Info Service works in cooperation with www.serbian-translation.com as well as the Kosovo Daily News (KDN) News List

Disclaimer:
The views expressed by the authors of newspaper articles or other texts which are not official communiqués or news reports by the Diocese are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of the Serbian Orthodox Church

Our Newsletters are available on our ERP KIM Info-service Web-Page:
/erpkiminfo.html

Additional information on our Diocese and the life of the Kosovo Serb Community may be found at:

Copyright 2003, ERP KIM Info-Service